J Sex Med. 2015 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12830. [Epub ahead of print]
Acupuncture for the Treatment of Vulvodynia: A Randomized Wait-List Controlled Pilot Study.
Schlaeger JM1, Xu N, Mejta CL, Park CG, Wilkie DJ.
Author information


Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
The incidence of vulvodynia in American women has been reported to be between 8.3% and 16%. However, there is no consistently effective standardized treatment for vulvodynia.
AIM:
To determine the feasibility and potential effects of using a standardized acupuncture protocol for the treatment of women with vulvodynia.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
The primary outcome was vulvar pain, and sexual function was the secondary outcome. Pain was assessed by the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and function was measured by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI).
METHODS:
Thirty-six women with vulvodynia met inclusion criteria. The women were randomly assigned either to the acupuncture group or to the wait-list control group. The 18 subjects assigned to the acupuncture group received acupuncture two times per week for 5 weeks for a total of 10 sessions.
RESULTS:
Reports of vulvar pain and dyspareunia were significantly reduced, whereas changes in the aggregate FSFI scores suggest significant improvement in sexual functioning in those receiving acupuncture vs. those who did not. Acupuncture did not significantly increase sexual desire, sexual arousal, lubrication, ability to orgasm or sexual satisfaction in women with vulvodynia.
CONCLUSION:
This was the first randomized controlled pilot study to examine the use of acupuncture for the treatment of vulvodynia. The acupuncture protocol was feasible and in this small sample appeared to reduce vulvar pain and dyspareunia with an increase in overall sexual function for women with vulvodynia. This study should be replicated in a larger double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Schlaeger JM, Xu N, Mejta CL, Park CG, and Wilkie DJ. Acupuncture for the treatment of vulvodynia: A randomized wait-list controlled pilot study. J Sex Med **;**:**-**.
© 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.


Urol Int. 2016 Apr 7. [Epub ahead of print]
A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study to Compare Acupuncture and Dapoxetine for the Treatment of Premature Ejaculation.
Sahin S1, Bicer M, Yenice MG, Seker KG, Yavuzsan AH, Tugcu V.
Author information


Abstract
PURPOSE:
To compare the safety and efficacy of dapoxetine and acupuncture for the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) with other treatment methods.
METHODS:
One hundred twenty patients with PE in an outpatient urology clinic were randomized to receive dapoxetine 30 mg and 60 mg, acupuncture or sham acupuncture. The intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), the PE diagnostic tool (PEDT) score, and adverse events were compared.
RESULTS:
There were no differences between the groups in terms of age, body mass index, baseline IELT and PEDT scores (p > 0.05). After 4 weeks, IELT was significantly longer compared to baseline values in all groups (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Comparisons between the groups showed that changes in IELT and PEDT observed after 4 weeks with dapoxetine 60 mg was significantly higher than those achieved in all other groups (p < 0.001 for all comparisons), changes observed with dapoxetine 30 mg was significantly higher than those achieved with acupuncture and sham acupuncture groups (p < 0.001 for both comparisons) and changes observed with acupuncture was significantly higher than those observed with sham acupuncture (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSION:
Our results confirm previous reports on the efficacy and safety of dapoxetine. Although less effective than dapoxetine, acupuncture had a significant ejaculation-delaying effect.